Skip to main content

Review of The Husband's Secret

The Husband's SecretThe Husband's Secret by Liane Moriarty
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

It's always a crap shoot when you step outside your normal reading genres and so often it only serves as a reminder of why you always stick to the same types of books. But every once in a while, something like this comes along and inspires you to take a few more chances in your literary life. The blurb for the Husband's Secret only mentions one of the four interwoven tales in this book. Cecilia finds a letter addressed "To my Darling wife, to be read only in the event of my death." One could be forgiven for thinking that the letter contains the eponymous secret. But there are many secrets in this books, spread over nearly every character in the book, and they all unfold with an easy grace that masks the skill of Liane Moriarty. Her omniscient narrator is so superbly done as to be seamless and she is one of the few adult authors who has bothered to give the children in the book individual personalities. So often children just serve as props who ejaculate pithy quips every now and again. But here, they all seem real, with all the cuteness and irritation that implies. The women in the book also seem real and every one of them (though quite different from me in most ways) spoke to me and my life experiences. Each of them invites the reader to examine herself and what she would do if, say, she found the letter addressed to Cecilia, or if she were confronted with her husband and cousin's affair, as Tess was. What would the reader do if her teenage daughter was murdered and the only suspect grew up to work in the same office, as happened to Rachel? Though the title inspired me to roll my eyes and mutter something derisive about "chick lit" under my breath, I genuinely enjoyed this and plan to seek out other work by this author.

View all my reviews

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

On Faith - Part One of my Daredevil Review

"I would rather die as Daredevil than live as Matt Murdock."

As I mentioned in my review of Daredevil Season 2,  I love this show, so I didn't want to simply write another review. Instead, I chose to write three articles on what I saw as the three main strengths of this season: its honest depiction or faith and the struggles of mere mortals to live it; the effects of psychopathy and the morality of treating people who have it; and the ability of friendships to fill the hole left by a missing family. In my Season 2 review, I mentioned how the show's writers have stayed true to the spirit of the comic in their characters, in the actors they cast, and the direction of the plot. Season 3 begins with another strong and unapologetic nod to the original comic: its focus on Matt's faith, or in this case, his loss of it.

In the last episode of The Defenders, a building fell directly on top of Matt Murdock, AKA Daredevil, as well as Elektra, the love of his life whose sou…

No, you don’t look younger than you are. Here’s why you shouldn’t want to

Moral Quagmires when on the Job

Ask a Manager is one of the very few blogs I follow. I check it every single day, delighting in the professional debacles the letter writers find themselves in. Unfailingly, Allison provides spot-on advice, emphasizing professional norms, office culture, and employment law in her responses. To be honest, her site is the reason I made Tess, the protagonist of my upcoming novella, an HR rep. I've never worked in HR, so reading Allison's site and seeing the absolutely unthinkable behavior of some employers made me grateful for literally every job I've ever had. Even the awful ones, because they were still better than some of these poor people's jobs. Don't believe me? A boss directed an employee, on pain of being fired, to leave a note at a grave for a worker who was on bereavement leave. Yeah, someone actually did that.

On the July 10 post, something unusual happened: I disagreed with Allison's advice. You can see the hyperlink, so please read it for yourself, b…