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I arranged my own marriage... and here's why you should too

We’re blessed to live in an age where society is starting to figure out that you don’t have to be married to be happy. You don’t need some man to “pick you” for you to be a valid member of society and you definitely don’t require a partner to be happy. But for those who are the marrying kind, sometimes it can feel discouraging. It’s hard to meet people once you’re out of school and internet dating can be frustrating, if not outright dangerous. But there are plenty of success stories, and I’m happy to say I’m one of them.

When I was 27, I decided I wanted to marry. I did not have a boyfriend and hadn’t in some time. My last pairing was a four-month boyfriend when I was 19. It ended amicably when the Marines stationed us on opposite coasts. In the intervening time, I got my college degree and moved to Las Vegas to take a job. I had an apartment, stable employment, and small savings. All I needed was a husband. But being a classic introvert, I rarely left my apartment except for work and groceries. That left the internet.

Wading into online dating and all its uncertainty was a big hurdle to overcome. In addition to being an introvert, I am also the no-nonsense type of person. I don’t ever want to hear the words “let’s wait and see,” from anyone, certainly not a romantic prospect. I also have no use for trite platitudes like, “when you stop looking, the right one will come along.” So I applied the same tactics I did that landed me my dream job right out of college. Keep your options open and be ultra-specific about what you want. That means fewer options, but they will be better options.

My ad read as follows: Read the rest at Thought Catalogue

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