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Review: UnWholly

UnWholly UnWholly by Neal Shusterman
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Book series can be tricky; you never know if the sequels will live up to the original. Unwholly not only lived up to Unwind, it surpassed it. Shusterman gives us a wider view of the world in which our characters live and the slippery, all-too-believable slope that brought our America to the reality of tearing teenagers apart for their organs and limbs. Using multiple POV characters and the dispassionate, all-seeing eye of internet news, Shusterman shows how easily people can do the unthinkable, if only enough people agree that it's the "right" thing.

The characters arcs of Connor, Lev, and Reesa were both fascinating and true to their characters as they were established in the first book. We also met new characters: Miracleena, a steadfast tithe who has what Gretchen Rubin calls an "Upholder personality"; and Starkey, who is the most perfectly manipulative bully to ever walk the earth. These were the major players, but there are others, and even the ones with only a few lines of dialogue or exist only to move the plot forward are real, living people with inner lives and unique attributes. Not only is the ploy riveting, the people and the world make the stakes matter to you as you're reading it. I can't wait to read the next one.

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